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73 Dogs removed from one property under the authority of the Ontario SPCA Act

 

Lucknow, ON (March 6, 2012) – On February 27, 2012, the Ontario SPCA executed 16 warrants following an investigation into multiple animal cruelty complaints. Onsite investigations resulted in orders being issued related to animal housing and some medical treatment involving ears, eyes, teeth and skin.

Ontario SPCA Peace Officers returned to some of the properties yesterday morning, as mandatory follow up to ensure orders were being met and standards of care as defined by the Ontario SPCA Act were provided and maintained. In some cases, orders have been met with compliance. In other cases, where compliance was not achieved, animals have been removed.

The Ontario SPCA removed 73 dogs today from one property, as recommended by a veterinarian, and the authority of the Ontario SPCA Act due to the owners’ failure to comply with the orders issued. The dogs were small to medium sized animals and a variety of breeds such as, Shar Peis, Basset Hounds, Pugs, Bulldogs, Beagles and Boston Terrier type dogs. The dogs will remain in the care of the Ontario SPCA while the investigation continues.

The investigation is ongoing. The Ontario SPCA will update the public as more information is available to share.

Ontario SPCA is obligated to address all animal cruelty complaints and there is a formal investigation process. As one of the largest, most responsive animal welfare organizations in the country, we provide care and shelter for tens of thousands of animals and respond to thousands of animal cruelty complaints each year. For more information about our investigation process please visit our website at ospcarescue.ca.

FAQ

When can the Ontario SPCA remove an animal?

Under the authority of the Ontario SPCA Act section 14.(1) the only grounds to remove an animal are under the following circumstances:

a. A veterinarian has examined the animal and has advised the inspector in writing that the animal's health and well being necessitates its removal

 

b. An inspector or agent has inspected the animal and has reasonable grounds for believing the animal is in immediate distress and the owner can't be found

 

c. An Order regarding the animal has been issued to the owner and has not been complied with

 

When would you consider an animal to be in immediate distress?
Animals considered to be in immediate distress are ones that require immediate attention to preserve life and require medical attention to address severe health needs that cannot be provided for onsite. During our investigation process, we often reach out to expert veterinarians to examine the animals and identify ones in immediate distress.

What does it mean to issue orders?

Where an Ontario SPCA Officer has reasonable grounds for believing that an animal is in distress and the owner or custodian of the animal is present or may be found promptly, the Officer may order the owner or custodian to take the necessary action to relieve the animal of its distress; or have the animal examined and treated by a veterinarian at the expense of the owner or custodian. An order is issued in writing and will specify the time within which the action is required to be performed. Once an order is issued, an Ontario SPCA Officer may return with or without a warrant, depending on the circumstances, to inspect the animal and the property for the purpose of determining compliance with the order.

For more information please contact:

Alison Cross

Senior Manager, Marketing & Communications

across@ospca.on.ca

905-853-2108

Agent Brad Dewar

Investigations & Communications Officer

bdewar@ospca.on.ca

289-383-3503


About Ontario SPCA and Humane Society:

Protecting animals since 1873, Ontario SPCA is Ontario's Animal Welfare organization. A registered charity comprised of over 50 Communities, Ontario SPCA relies on donations to fund animal protection, care and rehabilitation; veterinary services; community outreach; advocacy; and humane education.

Ontario SPCA is mandated under the Ontario SPCA Act to enforce animal welfare legislation and the Act provides Ontario SPCA Agents and Inspectors with police powers to do so.

Ontario SPCA provides leadership in animal welfare innovations including introducing high-volume spay/neuter services to Ontario and opening the Provincial Education and Animal Centre.

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