A Legacy of Care, Compassion and a Love of Cats

by | Interesting |

An early start with animals

The remarkable story of Nancy Hull’s lifelong involvement with the Ontario SPCA and Humane Society, her fabulous fostering, and commitment as a future legacy donor is a testament to her love of animals.

Nancy’s mother and maternal grandmother paved the way for her deep connection to helping animals in need. Even as young as eight, her mother would take her to the local animal shelter to help care for the cats. It became a cherished part of their time together, and cemented her passion for volunteering with animals, particularly helping cats and kittens.

“You know, helping animals just evolved as part of my lifestyle, and that’s just the way it is,” Nancy remarks with a laugh.

An Ode to a Maestro

Along her journey as a volunteer with the Ontario SPCA, Nancy came across a timid feline who had endured abuse. Despite the long scrapes on his back, broken nose and missing teeth, something drew Nancy to him, and she adopted him to finish his recovery. Naming him Maestro, he came out of his shell and settled into his new home.

“He’s proven he is a champion in many ways, not just physically but emotionally, mentally, loving and affectionate. I hope that he can prove to people not to be afraid of adopting a shelter cat since they’re so wonderful,” says Nancy.

The many rewards of fostering

Nancy knew Maestro’s calm demeanor could suit another important job. Nancy always enjoyed fostering young or orphaned kittens.

“It’s so rewarding to be able to help some of these animals develop some skills, such as socialization and confidence,” she says.

Having a lifetime of experience with fostering, she would place the foster kitten and Maestro into adjoining rooms, separated by a door. Maestro would then stretch his paws under the door to greet his new housemate.

“He would make soft trilling sounds, similar to a bird, which invites the kitten to play,” laughs Nancy.

Maestro has also taught many young cats and kittens life skills, including eating from a dish, how to clean themselves and how to interact with people. After Nancy and Maestro’s care and attention, she was thrilled to learn one of her recent foster kittens had been adopted only a few days after returning to the animal centre.

“Watching the growth and change, their progress, and knowing that this animal will be loved and wanted is so rewarding,” says Nancy.

A Legacy of compassion

In addition to fostering, participating with fundraising and helping with walkathon fundraisers, Nancy has also hosted donation birthday parties where guests bring much-needed supplies or donations for the Ontario SPCA and Humane Society.

While organizing her affairs for the future, Nancy decided an important part of her legal Will was a legacy gift to help animals.

“I just want to encourage people to continue their support. Sometimes people don’t want to think about it, or they’ll say they will do it later,” she says. “It’s important, it doesn’t take long, so just write it down!”

A legacy donation means that crucial funding can be continued in areas such as animal care and supplies, veterinary needs, and providing enrichment to the animals in our care. We are also able to continue important programs such as managing wild cat colonies, cost-effective community spay/neuter services and education programs to cultivate a love, compassion and knowledge of animals and their care.

Nancy’s lifetime of support is truly valued and appreciated. We are so honoured by the amount of compassion from donors and supporters just like Nancy.

“They will always need our help, and they always help us. It’s important to give back,” Nancy says.

Speaking for the ones who can’t speak for themselves

Keep up the good work speaking for the ones who can’t speak for themselves. A society who cares for their animals is a better society.  Thanks for your good work!

-Suzali